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Summer 2015 (Vol. 20, No. 1)

 

In this issue:

• It’s My Life! Considering the Student-directed IEP Process (Part 1  of 2) - by Julie Maier, CDBS Educational Specialist

• The Case for Wider Access to Braille in Schools - by Maurice Belote, CDBS Project Coordinator

• The Power of Connection - by Julie Maier, CDBS Educational Specialist

• Student Reflections - by Graduates of the Specialization in Education of Students with Deaf-Blindness at San Francisco State University

 

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Contents|pdfs

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photo of Julie MaierIt’s My Life! Considering the Student-directed IEP Process (Part 1 of 2)
by Julie Maier
CDBS Educational Specialist

IDEA requires that students are involved in their individualized education plans (IEPs) beginning at the age of 17, a year before the student reaches age of majority (18 years of age), and are legally responsible for their IEP at the age of 18 unless they are otherwise conserved. Following a student-directed IEP process is a meaningful and effective way to prepare students for this important adult role. This student-centered process promotes and teaches many of the relevant self-determination and self-advocacy skills that have been identified as high-priority post-school outcomes for students with disabilities. For students to be meaningfully involved in the development of their IEP plans they need to be aware, informed, and allowed to participate, to the greatest extent possible, in all phases of the process—planning and assessment; participation in the meeting and development of goals and identification of supports and services; and consistent evaluation of progress on those goals and effectiveness of supports and accommodations. Students will require varying levels of instruction, support, and feedback from their teachers, support staff and families in order to successfully direct this IEP process.

 .... It’s My Life! Considering the Student-directed IEP Process (Part 1 of 2)


photo of Maurice BeloteThe Case for Wider Access to Braille in Schools
by Maurice Belote
CDBS Project Coordinator

Students who do not have vision should have the same access to braille as children who are sighted have to print materials. Labeling familiar objects with braille and giving children access to basic braille books can be provided at little or no cost and does not require training in teaching braille or even previous knowledge of the braille alphabet.

 .... The Case for Wider Access to Braille in Schools


photo of Julie MaierThe Power of Connection
by Julie Maier, CDBS Educational Specialist

People who are part of the world of deaf-blindness – either personally, as a family member, or as a professional – are aware of the importance of social connections and relationships for individuals who are deaf-blind, as well as the challenges of making, supporting, and sustaining those connections. One of my most indelible memories from this past summer occurred in late June near the end of a rather impromptu picnic lunch at San Francisco’s Crissy Field between members of DeafBlind Citizens in Action (DBCA) and a few students from the San Francisco State University Specialization in Deaf-Blindness teacher training program.

 .... The Power of Connection


group photo of Graduates of the Specialization Program in the Education of Students with Deaf-Blindness at San Francisco State UniversityStudent Reflections
by Graduates of the Specialization in Education of Students with Deaf-Blindness at San Francisco State University

In the fall of 2014, the Moderate-Severe Disabilities Program at San Francisco State University received a four-year federally-funded personnel preparation grant to prepare student teachers in the education of students who are deaf-blind entitled Specialization Program in the Education of Students Deaf-Blindness. CDBS staff collaborated with this SFSU specialization program by leading seminar sessions and providing fieldwork and internships experiences to seven selected student teachers. The following selections were compiled from reflections written by the first cohort of students in response to course readings and presentations from CDBS staff, as well as fieldwork experiences. We found that each piece selected is a strong representation of each candidate’s unique experiences, philosophies, and approaches to the fields of deaf-blindness and education.

 .... Student Reflections 


 

Topic: reSources Summer 2015

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