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Spring 2016 (Vol. 21, No. 1)

 

In this issue:

• From deaf-blind to deafblind: Time for CDBS to make the change - by Maurice Belote, CDBS Project Coordinator

• The Power of Positive Interactions and Reinforcement with Children who are Deafblind - by Stacy Aguilera, CDBS Educational Specialist

• Letting go to let them Grow: Teaching Independence - by Myrna Medina, CDBS Family Specialist

It’s My Life! Considering the Student-directed IEP Process (Part 2 of 2) - by Julie Maier, CDBS Educational Specialist

 

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Contents|pdfs

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photo of Maurice BeloteFrom deaf-blind to deafblind: Time for CDBS to make the change
by Maurice Belote
CDBS Project Coordinator

CDBS will be switching our terminology from “deaf-blind” to “deafblind” to
better correspond with deafblind groups’ use of their own preferred terms.

 .... From deaf-blind to deafblind: Time for CDBS to make the change


photo of Stacy AguileraThe Power of Positive Interactions and Reinforcement with Children who are Deafblind
by Stacy Aguilera, CDBS Educational Specialist

Children who are deafblind need to gain a sense of success and be surrounded by positive experiences to feel empowered and reach milestones in their lives. Even as adults, if we lack confidence in a certain area of our life, we are less likely to venture into that realm. It is much easier to stay where we feel safe than to step out of our comfort zone and try new things. Multiple things have to be in place for us to do anything outside our comfort zone. The same thing applies to individuals with deafblindness. In this article, I will show how to create an environment that allows the space for a child with deafblindness to learn and grow using positive experiences and reinforcement.

 .... The Power of Positive Interactions and Reinforcement with Children who are Deafblind


photo of Myrna MedinaLetting go to let them Grow: Teaching Independence
Myrna Medina, CDBS Family Specialist

When we parents think about our children being independent, we may picture them as all grown up in a happy life, with us hoping that they will find a good job, be part of a community, and maybe even get married. When looking at this future picture, it may seem like “independence” is an event that happens down the road. The reality is that we have already been promoting their independence from a very early age without realizing that we have started the process of letting them go.

 .... Letting go to let them Grow: Teaching Independence


photo of Julie MaierIt’s My Life! Considering the Student-directed IEP Process (Part 2 of 2)
by Julie Maier
CDBS Educational Specialist

IDEA requires that students are involved in their individualized education plans (IEPs) beginning at the age of 17, a year before the student reaches age of majority (18 years of age), and are legally responsible for their IEP at the age of 18 unless they are otherwise conserved. Following a student-directed IEP process is a meaningful and effective way to prepare students for this important adult role. This student-centered process promotes and teaches many of the relevant self-determination and self-advocacy skills that have been identified as high-priority post-school outcomes for students with disabilities. For students to be meaningfully involved in the development of their IEP plans they need to be aware, informed, and allowed to participate, to the greatest extent possible, in all phases of the process—planning and assessment; participation in the meeting and development of goals and identification of supports and services; and consistent evaluation of progress on those goals and effectiveness of supports and accommodations. Students will require varying levels of instruction, support, and feedback from their teachers, support staff and families in order to successfully direct this IEP process.

 .... It’s My Life! Considering the Student-directed IEP Process (Part 2 of 2)


 

Topic: reSources Spring 2016

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